Updated: Constant, powerful seepage from ocean floor — ALL 3 VIDEOS


UPDATE: Click for *MUST SEE* Non-stop black blobs seeping from seafloor — Front and OVERHEAD views (VIDEO)

Live feed from Ocean Intervention III -- ROV 1, August 17, 2010 at 2:45 p.m. EDT:

Observe the seafloor in bottom left of video. The constant, powerful flow is at its peak after 1:00 minute in to video.


Here is a still photo of the same camera angle without the non-stop plumes and flying chunks emanating from the seafloor:


Part II: Compare the inactivity on the right side of the video with the non-stop activity on the left. Largest bursts at 1:35 in, 1:55 in., and 2:10 in.


Part III: First segment is real-time, second is 2x time-lapse, third is 4x.

7 comments to Updated: Constant, powerful seepage from ocean floor — ALL 3 VIDEOS

  • JasonN

    There has been some talk over at theoildrum.com, in which most of the posters there seem to be blowing off what is seen on the ROV's as a product of thrust from the vehicles.

    I do not buy that explanation. Something is going on and I guess we will not know the full extent until it is too late to do anything about it.

  • John L

    When I look at these videos I can't make any sense of it. The picture isn't clear and we don't see the source of whatever is causing all that activity.

  • Robert

    One think is somewhat clear, there appears to be a strong continuous current in the water sweeping everything to one side. I do not believe the thrusters on the ROV operate continuously, but I may be wrong. Why would there be such a strong current? Also the size of the field of view we are looking at cannot be determined, because there are no reference objects. This field of view can be anything from microscopic on upward.

  • total dailure, that video shows ... nothing
    worst possible quality.

  • ducq

    The public attention span for a political or newsworthy item is well-known: 20 days.

    Note also that all the classic formulas for misdirection of our attention have been and are being followed.

    In order to calmly assess the situation, one needs a perspective of years and decades. The average television frame-view switch of 3 to 9 per second trains our brains against this.

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