Kessler/Valentine Findings: “Potential for a MUCH longer-lived METHANE plume in the deep ocean, with unknown consequences” — Due to “SLOW consumption rate”


Scientists document fate of deep hydrocarbon plumes in Gulf oil spill, PhysOrg.com, September 16, 2010:

Excerpts

In the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, a team of scientists led by UC Santa Barbara's David Valentine and Texas A&M University's John Kessler embarked on a research cruise with an urgent mission: determining the fate and impact of hydrocarbon gases escaping from a deep-water oil spill. ...

While the results of this study suggest that ethane, propane and butane plumes may disappear quickly, methane may not, due to its relatively slow consumption rate.

This suggests the potential for a much longer-lived methane plume in the deep ocean, with unknown consequences.

To address this issue, Valentine and Kessler are currently leading another expedition supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in an attempt to determine the longer-term fate of methane and oil in the deep Gulf waters.

Provided to PhysOrg.com by Texas A&M University

h/t BPGulfLeak and TheMerriCat

1 comment to Kessler/Valentine Findings: “Potential for a MUCH longer-lived METHANE plume in the deep ocean, with unknown consequences” — Due to “SLOW consumption rate”

  • The Gulf of Mexico and the people living along the coast, provide a stimulating petri dish for the researchers.

    They're far more interested in absorbing the funds available -- to fund their research and paychecks, rather than making that money available to the people. Their guinea pigs need their communities rebuilt, their bank accounts stuffed, and the best medical care money can buy.

    That's alot of money and there are millions of people.

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