Oily substance reported 100 MILES EAST of Panama City, nearing FLORIDA’S West Coast — Buried under 18 inches of sand (VIDEOS)


Filmed at Bald Point State Park and St. Teresa in Northwest Florida. This is in a region known as the Big Bend, where Florida's Panhandle turns into the west coast of the Florida Peninsula.


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See also: St. Josephs Bay, FL  Hundreds of dead fish & crabs wash up just before FL Seafood Fest; Fishermen ask DISPERSANTS? Officials blame OXYGEN levels

Start of Digging, St. Teresa, August 22, 2010:

Frothy Mousse-like oil/water in hole dug away from beachline (at Bald Point, August 22, 2010:

Tar Balls on Bald Point, August 22, 2010:

Last Video Bald Point, Oily coffee filter, murky sample, August 22, 2010:

Bald Point, FL August 17, 2010 at 5:00 p.m. EDT:

Bald Point, FL August 17, 2010 at 5:00 p.m. EDT:

Bald Point, FL August 17, 2010 at 5:00 p.m. EDT:

6 comments to Oily substance reported 100 MILES EAST of Panama City, nearing FLORIDA’S West Coast — Buried under 18 inches of sand (VIDEOS)

  • xdrfox

    Frothy Mousse-like oil/water in hole dug away from beachline (at Bald Point, August 22, 2010: THE FOAM... Warm ..." COREXIT "

  • I knew it was only a matter of time before we saw oil east of St. Joseph.

    This doesn't bode well for the nature coast or the Tampa bay area at all!

    -John
    http://www.ncoalblog.com

  • We originally posted this story on the Test The Rain.com website. I have talked to the marine lab located very close to this beach and it turns out that the oily substance found in the holes is decaying organic peat which is a very unique aquatic plant for this area. We have updated our information concerning these videos. Although the explanation is very sound we are still going to test the samples collected by the volunteer. If you would like to see the video explaining the organic peat please go to

    http://testtherain.com/?p=961

    It is our goal to bring the truth to the public. We could only wish that all the other beaches and health issues due to the Gulf Spill could be explained by organic peat.

  • Jean

    I live in Tallahassee and go to Bald Point Beach frequently. After seeing these videos on another website, I went to Bald Point yesterday evening. I didn't find any tar balls, but when I dug in the sand, I saw foamy water coming in. I suspect that disperants have been used in this area throughout the summer. I'm a birdwatcher and go early in the morning, and on several occasions, I could smell something strange. It didn't smell like oil; it was an unfamiliar smell. On these same mornings, I saw something in the water that could have been sea foam, but there was no wind and only limited wave action early in the morning. It was sort of bubbly, floating in the water and on patches of seaweed. At the time, I thought I was just imagining things.

  • Jean

    Glad to see that this was organic peat at Bald Point. I picked up several pieces last night, thinking that they were tar balls, but I could tell that it was decayed plant material.

  • patty t., alabama

    great reports guys, but you need gloves on!

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